A Look at Child Custody and Where It Goes

Child Custody

When deciding on the custody of a child, many factors must be taken into consideration, such as the age of the child, stability of the family, and the welfare of all the children involved. Along with these important factors, custody laws vary from state to state, making it important that parents understand their rights and how to go about getting custody of their child or children. In St. Louis, there are a number of child custody attorneys who specialize in this area of the law. Here are some things to consider if you are going through a divorce or similar situation:

Legal Definition Of Child Custody – St. Louis Child Custody Laws defines custody as having the legal authority to make decisions for your children. This includes deciding where your child will live, how they will spend the day-to-day activities of their life, and whether or not they will have religious instruction. Parents may also decide which religion they want their children to practice and the like. Legal custody is also determined by whether the parents have joint or sole custody.

Types Of Custody – There are two main types of custody laws. In a Joint Custody Agreement, the partners submit parenting plans to the court, stating how they wish to parent their child. They then listen to the judge and agree on the plan. In a Sole Custody Agreement, only one parent is listed on the agreement, and that parent makes all decisions for the child. Both parents can petition the courts to change the custody arrangements, if necessary. Also, courts can award sole physical custody to one parent, or joint physical custody to both parents, depending on the child’s needs.

Who Are Adopted Children’s Legal Parents? The court does not have to rule on adoption. The state will decide which biological parent the child will be raised by and will determine what type of custody the child will have. If you live in a state that does not allow unmarried parents to adopt, the child will be under the care of your biological parents, unless the court allows otherwise. However, if you do live in a state that allows unmarried parents to adopt, the court will review the adoption and make its own determination about who will be the child’s legal parents.

How Does Divorce Affect Child Custody? In some cases, one or both parties to seek a divorce because they are unhappy with the other parent. For example, if a couple has been trying to get divorced and they haven’t succeeded, it may be worth the time and expense to file for a divorce, especially if the unhappy couple had already set up a child. On the other hand, if the divorce was caused by the children’s welfare being threatened, then it is much better for the children if the parents remain together for the children’s sake.

What About Wishes About Paternity? If one of the parents has made wishes about custody or visitation, and those wishes are not authorized by the court, it will usually be the duty of the court to recognize those wishes. If there are problems along the way (i.e. the father wants to be involved in the decision), those problems must be dealt with. If the parents can work out an agreement that satisfies their wishes, then the court will usually respect that agreement.